Our services

Our experienced team at 47 West Street Reigate, cares about your dental health. We are firmly committed to delivering pain-free dentistry to keep you healthy and smiling with confidence.

Initial consultation

£40

At your initial consultation, your dentist will:

  • carry out a full examination of your mouth, teeth and gums
  • ask about your general health and any problems you have had with your teeth, mouth or gums since your last visit
  • ask about and advise on your diet, smoking and drinking
  • ask about your teeth-cleaning habits and give you advice on the most appropriate ways to keep your mouth, teeth and gums healthy
  • explain any risks, as well as costs, of all treatment you may need
    discuss with you when your next visit should be

Your dentist will recommend how often you should come to see them, based on your current dental health.

If you have problems with your teeth between check-ups, give us a call to make an earlier appointment.

Initial consultation

Routine 6 monthly examination

£35

Digital scan

£150

Second Opinion

£35

Routine scale and polish

£55

Prescription

£ 30

Emergency including prescription

£ 40

Emergency non-patient including prescription

£ 90

Splinting

£130

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Acrylic full dentures

£800

Acrylic partial dentures

£850

Acrylic partial dentures

£700

Chrome-Cobalt full dentures

£ 1500

Chrome-Cobalt partial dentures

£1400

Addition for three or more

£ 300

Addition for clasp

£ 200

Denture relining

£ 250

Tooth Immediate Denture from

£ 550

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Study models

£70

Inlay/Onlay/Overlay (Gold)

£850

Inlay/Onlay/Overlay (Porcelain)

650

Crown (Gold)

£1000

Crown (Porcelain bonded to alloy)

£550

Crown (Porcelain bonded to Gold

£1000

Crown (Full Porcelain)

£575

Conventional Bridge

£650

Post & core

£250

Porcelain Veneers

£ 575

Maryland Bridge

£ 550

Conventional Bridge

£650

Night guard (soft)

£150

Sports guard

£275

Fastbraces

£ 3000

Invisalign

£ 3500

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Routine scale and polish

£ 55

Scaling and polishing

Dental cleanings involve removing plaque (soft, sticky, bacteria infested film) and tartar (calculus) deposits that have built up on the teeth over time. Your teeth are continually bathed in saliva which contains calcium and other substances which help strengthen and protect the teeth. While this is a good thing, it also means that we tend to get a build-up of calcium deposits on the teeth. This chalky substance will eventually build up over time, like limescale in a pipe or kettle. Usually, it is tooth coloured and can easily be mistaken as part of the teeth, but it also can vary from brown to black in colour.

If the scale, or calculus (tartar, as dentists like to call it) is allowed to accumulate on the teeth it will, unfortunately, provide the right conditions for bacteria to thrive next to the gums. The purpose of the cleaning and polishing is basically to leave the surfaces of the teeth clean and smooth so that bacteria are unable to stick to them and you have a better chance of keeping the teeth clean during your regular home care.

Also, it leaves your teeth feeling lovely and smooth and clean, which is nice when you run your tongue around them. Actually, come to think of it, there’s nothing worse than someone you fancy running their tongue around your teeth and finding a piece of spinach or something! Still, if they’re hungry…

The professional cleaning of teeth is sometimes referred to as prophylaxis (or prophy for short). It’s a Greek word which means “to prevent beforehand” – in this case, it helps prevent gum disease.

How are dental cleanings done?

Our dentist uses specialised instruments to gently remove these deposits without harming the teeth. The instruments which may be used during your cleaning, and what they feel like, are described below.

Ultrasonic instrument

Commonly used first is an ultrasonic instrument which uses tickling vibrations to knock larger pieces of tartar loose. It also sprays a cooling mist of water while it works to wash away debris and keep the area at a proper temperature. The device typically emits a humming or high pitched whistling sound. This may seem louder than it actually is because the sound may get amplified inside your head, just like when you put an electric toothbrush into your mouth.

The ultrasonic instrument tips are curved and rounded and are always kept in motion around the teeth. They are by no means sharp since their purpose is to knock tartar loose and not to cut into the teeth. It is best to inform the operator if the sensations are too strong or ticklish so that they can adjust the setting appropriately on the device or modify the pressure applied.

With larger deposits that have hardened on, it can take some time to remove these, just like trying to remove baked-on grime on a stove that has been left over a long time. So your cleaning may take longer than future cleanings. Imagine not cleaning a house for six months versus cleaning it every week. The six-month job is going to take longer than doing smaller weekly jobs.
Fine hand tools

Once the larger pieces of tartar are gone, the dental worker will switch to finer hand tools (called scalers and curettes in dental-speak) to remove smaller deposits and smoothen the tooth surfaces. These tools are curved and shaped to match the curves of the teeth. They allow smaller tartar deposits to be removed by carefully scraping them off with a gentle to moderate amount of pressure. Just like taking a scrubbing brush to a soiled pot, the dental worker has to get the areas clean and smooth.

Polishing

Once all the surfaces are smooth, the dental worker may polish your teeth. Polishing is done using a slow speed handpiece with a soft rubber cup that spins on the end. Prophylaxis (short for prophy) paste – a special gritty toothpaste-like material – is scooped up like ice cream into the cup and spun around on the teeth to make them shiny smooth.

Fluoride

Your dentist may also apply fluoride.

Fluoride foam or gel is then placed into small, flexible foam trays and placed over the teeth for 30 seconds. Afterwards, the patient is directed to spit as much out as possible into a saliva ejector. The fluoride helps to strengthen the teeth since the acids from bacteria in dental tartar and plaque will have weakened the surfaces. It is best not to eat, drink or rinse for 30 minutes after the fluoride has been applied.

Is it going to be painful?

Most people find that cleanings are painless, and find the sensations described above – tickling vibrations, the cooling mist of water, and the feeling of pressure during “scraping” – do not cause discomfort. A lot of people even report that they enjoy cleanings and the lovely smooth feel of their teeth afterwards! There may be odd zingy sensations, but many people don’t mind as they only last a nanosecond.

Be sure to let us know if you find things are getting too uncomfortable for your liking. They can recommend various options to make the cleaning more enjoyable.

Painful cleaning experiences can be caused by a number of things: a rough dentist or hygienist, exposed dentine (not dangerous, but can make cleanings unpleasant), or sore gum tissues.

In case you may have had painful cleaning experiences in the past, switching to a gentle dentist and perhaps a spot of nitrous oxide can often make all the difference. You could also choose to be numbed. If you find the scaling a bit uncomfortable because the gum tissues (rather than the teeth themselves) are sensitive, topical numbing gels can be used.

Routine scale and polish

Intensive scale and polish

£80

Advanced non surgical gum

£ 120

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Fissure sealant

£35

Temporary filling

£85

Amalgam (depending on size)

£150

Composite (white)

£150

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Incisor

£375

Premolar

£400

Molar

£450

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Incisor

£375

Premolar

£400

Molar

£450

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Zoom chair-side whitening

£550

Zoom home whitening refills x 1

£40

Zoom home whitening refills x 3

£ 120

Zoom home whitening refills x 6

£ 240

Boutique home Whitening

£ 375 – 475

Home Whitening upper tray

£ 150

Home Whitening lower tray

£ 150

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Simple extraction

£110

A dental extraction (also referred to as tooth extraction, exodontia, exodontics, or historically, tooth pulling) is the removal of teeth from the dental alveolus (socket) in the alveolar bone. Extractions are performed for a wide variety of reasons, but most commonly to remove teeth which have become unrestorable through tooth decay, periodontal disease or dental trauma; especially when they are associated with toothache. Sometimes wisdom teeth are impacted (stuck and unable to grow normally into the mouth) and may cause recurrent infections of the gum (pericoronitis). In orthodontics, if the teeth are crowded, sound teeth may be extracted (often bicuspids) to create space so the rest of the teeth can be straightened.

Tooth extraction is usually relatively straightforward, and the vast majority can be usually performed quickly while the individual is awake by using local anaesthetic injections to eliminate painful sensations. Local anaesthetic blocks pain, but mechanical forces are still vaguely felt. Some teeth are more difficult to remove for several reasons, especially related to the tooth’s position, the shape of the tooth roots and the integrity of the tooth. Dental phobia is an issue for some individuals, and tooth extraction tends to be feared more than other dental treatments like fillings. If a tooth is buried in the bone, a surgical or trans alveolar approach may be required, which involves cutting the gum away and removal of the bone which is holding the tooth in with a surgical drill. After the tooth is removed, stitches are used to replace the gum into the normal position.

Immediately after the tooth is removed, a bite pack is used to apply pressure to the tooth socket and stop the bleeding. After tooth extraction, dentists usually give advice which revolves around not disturbing the blood clot in the socket by not touching the area with a finger or the tongue, by avoiding vigorous rinsing of the mouth and avoiding strenuous activity. If the blood clot is dislodged, bleeding can restart, or alveolar osteitis (“dry socket”) can develop, which can be very painful and lead to delayed healing of the socket. Smoking is avoided for at least 24 hours as it impairs wound healing and makes dry socket significantly more likely. Most advise hot salt water mouth baths which start 24 hours after the extraction.

The branch of dentistry that deals primarily with extractions is oral surgery (“exodontia”), although general dentists and clinicians from other dental specialities may also carry out tooth extraction routinely since it is a core skill taught in dental schools.

Extraction

Surgical extraction

£255

Dry socket

£65

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